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Old 07-25-2007, 01:22 PM   #1
Diarmid Logan
 
Default Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

http://www.nutraingredientsusa.com/n...ws.asp?id=7536

Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

10/28/03 - A low-carbohydrate diet may be more effective than reducing
fat intake for prevention of prostate cancer, suggests a laboratory
study by researchers in the US.

Previous studies have suggested a link between the amount of saturated
fat in the diet and the risk of progression to advanced prostate
cancer.

But Ada Elgavish and colleagues from the University of Alabama at
Birmingham found that carbohydrate intake may be more significant for
men wishing to delay progression to advanced prostate cancer.

"In the low-fat versus low-carbohydrate debate, we're finding that
under conditions in which diet is provided ad libitum, a diet with
fewer carbohydrates may be more effective in preventing progression to
advanced, lethal prostate cancer than a diet with low fat content,"
said Dr Elgavish, lead author of the study, presenting the research at
this week's AACR meeting, Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research.

"However, the results of this study are preliminary. Men should talk
to their doctors before changing their diets," she added.

The investigators compared the relative risk of developing advanced
prostate cancer with a low-carbohydrate or a low-fat diet provided ad
libitum (as much as wished), beginning before tumours developed and
continuing until middle age.

The study was carried out in TRAMP mice, biologically engineered to
develop prostate cancer after puberty, developed by Dr Greenberg and
associates at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Two groups of
TRAMP mice were fed diets containing the same amount of calories, with
either 10 per cent or 45 per cent fat (mostly lard). Carbohydrates,
mostly corn starch and sucrose, replaced fat in the low-fat diet.

Researchers measured food intake and body weight throughout the
23-week study.

After the onset of middle age, mice fed the 45 per cent fat diet had a
consistently higher body weight due to higher body fat. When the study
ended, 95 per cent of the mice fed the 45 per cent fat diet had
survived, compared with only 68.2 per cent of those fed with the 10
per cent fat diet.

In addition, the percentage of mice with advanced prostate cancer in
the 45 per cent fat group was one-third of that in the group fed the
10 per cent fat diet, reported the researcher.

If the results are confirmed in humans, they could provoke a shift in
thinking on prostate cancer prevention. Last year researchers from the
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center reported finding decreased risk
for late-stage prostate cancer in men on low-fat and moderate calcium
diets. Numerous other studies support a low-fat, high fibre diet,
(advised by the Pritikin programme), to keep prostate cancer at bay.
The new study suggests more research is needed to clarify advice for
prostate cancer patients.

http://www.aacr.org/2003prevention.asp
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:25 PM   #2
Patricia Heil
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

First off this is mice. There have been other things that
worked in mice but not humans.

Diarmid Logan wrote:
>
> http://www.nutraingredientsusa.com/n...ws.asp?id=7536
>
> Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?
>
> 10/28/03 - A low-carbohydrate diet may be more effective than reducing
> fat intake for prevention of prostate cancer, suggests a laboratory
> study by researchers in the US.
>
> Previous studies have suggested a link between the amount of saturated
> fat in the diet and the risk of progression to advanced prostate
> cancer.
>
> But Ada Elgavish and colleagues from the University of Alabama at
> Birmingham found that carbohydrate intake may be more significant for
> men wishing to delay progression to advanced prostate cancer.
>
> "In the low-fat versus low-carbohydrate debate, we're finding that
> under conditions in which diet is provided ad libitum, a diet with
> fewer carbohydrates may be more effective in preventing progression to
> advanced, lethal prostate cancer than a diet with low fat content,"
> said Dr Elgavish, lead author of the study, presenting the research at
> this week's AACR meeting, Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research.
>
> "However, the results of this study are preliminary. Men should talk
> to their doctors before changing their diets," she added.
>
> The investigators compared the relative risk of developing advanced
> prostate cancer with a low-carbohydrate or a low-fat diet provided ad
> libitum (as much as wished), beginning before tumours developed and
> continuing until middle age.
>
> The study was carried out in TRAMP mice, biologically engineered to
> develop prostate cancer after puberty, developed by Dr Greenberg and
> associates at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Two groups of
> TRAMP mice were fed diets containing the same amount of calories, with
> either 10 per cent or 45 per cent fat (mostly lard). Carbohydrates,
> mostly corn starch and sucrose, replaced fat in the low-fat diet.
>
> Researchers measured food intake and body weight throughout the
> 23-week study.
>
> After the onset of middle age, mice fed the 45 per cent fat diet had a
> consistently higher body weight due to higher body fat. When the study
> ended, 95 per cent of the mice fed the 45 per cent fat diet had
> survived, compared with only 68.2 per cent of those fed with the 10
> per cent fat diet.
>
> In addition, the percentage of mice with advanced prostate cancer in
> the 45 per cent fat group was one-third of that in the group fed the
> 10 per cent fat diet, reported the researcher.
>
> If the results are confirmed in humans, they could provoke a shift in
> thinking on prostate cancer prevention. Last year researchers from the
> Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center reported finding decreased risk
> for late-stage prostate cancer in men on low-fat and moderate calcium
> diets. Numerous other studies support a low-fat, high fibre diet,
> (advised by the Pritikin programme), to keep prostate cancer at bay.
> The new study suggests more research is needed to clarify advice for
> prostate cancer patients.
>
> http://www.aacr.org/2003prevention.asp
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:25 PM   #3
Patricia Heil
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

First off this is mice. There have been other things that
worked in mice but not humans.

Diarmid Logan wrote:
>
> http://www.nutraingredientsusa.com/n...ws.asp?id=7536
>
> Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?
>
> 10/28/03 - A low-carbohydrate diet may be more effective than reducing
> fat intake for prevention of prostate cancer, suggests a laboratory
> study by researchers in the US.
>
> Previous studies have suggested a link between the amount of saturated
> fat in the diet and the risk of progression to advanced prostate
> cancer.
>
> But Ada Elgavish and colleagues from the University of Alabama at
> Birmingham found that carbohydrate intake may be more significant for
> men wishing to delay progression to advanced prostate cancer.
>
> "In the low-fat versus low-carbohydrate debate, we're finding that
> under conditions in which diet is provided ad libitum, a diet with
> fewer carbohydrates may be more effective in preventing progression to
> advanced, lethal prostate cancer than a diet with low fat content,"
> said Dr Elgavish, lead author of the study, presenting the research at
> this week's AACR meeting, Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research.
>
> "However, the results of this study are preliminary. Men should talk
> to their doctors before changing their diets," she added.
>
> The investigators compared the relative risk of developing advanced
> prostate cancer with a low-carbohydrate or a low-fat diet provided ad
> libitum (as much as wished), beginning before tumours developed and
> continuing until middle age.
>
> The study was carried out in TRAMP mice, biologically engineered to
> develop prostate cancer after puberty, developed by Dr Greenberg and
> associates at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Two groups of
> TRAMP mice were fed diets containing the same amount of calories, with
> either 10 per cent or 45 per cent fat (mostly lard). Carbohydrates,
> mostly corn starch and sucrose, replaced fat in the low-fat diet.
>
> Researchers measured food intake and body weight throughout the
> 23-week study.
>
> After the onset of middle age, mice fed the 45 per cent fat diet had a
> consistently higher body weight due to higher body fat. When the study
> ended, 95 per cent of the mice fed the 45 per cent fat diet had
> survived, compared with only 68.2 per cent of those fed with the 10
> per cent fat diet.
>
> In addition, the percentage of mice with advanced prostate cancer in
> the 45 per cent fat group was one-third of that in the group fed the
> 10 per cent fat diet, reported the researcher.
>
> If the results are confirmed in humans, they could provoke a shift in
> thinking on prostate cancer prevention. Last year researchers from the
> Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center reported finding decreased risk
> for late-stage prostate cancer in men on low-fat and moderate calcium
> diets. Numerous other studies support a low-fat, high fibre diet,
> (advised by the Pritikin programme), to keep prostate cancer at bay.
> The new study suggests more research is needed to clarify advice for
> prostate cancer patients.
>
> http://www.aacr.org/2003prevention.asp
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:25 PM   #4
Nicholas
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

"Patricia Heil" <pjayheil@erols.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
news:3F9EE109.91251FD7@erols.com...
>
> First off this is mice. There have been other things that
> worked in mice but not humans.
>


Yeah, this is ridicolous
Rats and mice have nothing to do with humans with respect to trophic
features
They belong to a difference class compared to primate humans
They are not adapted to an high carb diets of fruits, berries, vegetables,
nut and fish
In fact, while humans handle fructose quite well, fructose is quite
dangerous to mice, but we know that primates eat fruits whereas I have never
seen rats eating a banana

As Steve Harris says "If you're a rat,
you shouldn't eat fructose. Next rat that comes to me for a health
consultation, I'll be sure and council him very well on the issue"

So please, don't even post studies on rats or mice that are supposed to be
used for human health, they're cruelty useless and if one is going to change
his/her diet because of rats experiments then they become even dangerous !!

Nicholas
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:25 PM   #5
Nicholas
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

"Patricia Heil" <pjayheil@erols.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
news:3F9EE109.91251FD7@erols.com...
>
> First off this is mice. There have been other things that
> worked in mice but not humans.
>


Yeah, this is ridicolous
Rats and mice have nothing to do with humans with respect to trophic
features
They belong to a difference class compared to primate humans
They are not adapted to an high carb diets of fruits, berries, vegetables,
nut and fish
In fact, while humans handle fructose quite well, fructose is quite
dangerous to mice, but we know that primates eat fruits whereas I have never
seen rats eating a banana

As Steve Harris says "If you're a rat,
you shouldn't eat fructose. Next rat that comes to me for a health
consultation, I'll be sure and council him very well on the issue"

So please, don't even post studies on rats or mice that are supposed to be
used for human health, they're cruelty useless and if one is going to change
his/her diet because of rats experiments then they become even dangerous !!

Nicholas
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:25 PM   #6
Ignoramus16911
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

great post. Could not have said it better myself.

i

In article <CLBnb.14846$uv4.12545@news.edisontel.com>, Nicholas wrote:
>
> "Patricia Heil" <pjayheil@erols.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
> news:3F9EE109.91251FD7@erols.com...
>>
>> First off this is mice. There have been other things that
>> worked in mice but not humans.
>>

>
> Yeah, this is ridicolous
> Rats and mice have nothing to do with humans with respect to trophic
> features
> They belong to a difference class compared to primate humans
> They are not adapted to an high carb diets of fruits, berries, vegetables,
> nut and fish
> In fact, while humans handle fructose quite well, fructose is quite
> dangerous to mice, but we know that primates eat fruits whereas I have never
> seen rats eating a banana
>
> As Steve Harris says "If you're a rat,
> you shouldn't eat fructose. Next rat that comes to me for a health
> consultation, I'll be sure and council him very well on the issue"
>
> So please, don't even post studies on rats or mice that are supposed to be
> used for human health, they're cruelty useless and if one is going to change
> his/her diet because of rats experiments then they become even dangerous !!
>
> Nicholas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:25 PM   #7
Ignoramus16911
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

great post. Could not have said it better myself.

i

In article <CLBnb.14846$uv4.12545@news.edisontel.com>, Nicholas wrote:
>
> "Patricia Heil" <pjayheil@erols.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
> news:3F9EE109.91251FD7@erols.com...
>>
>> First off this is mice. There have been other things that
>> worked in mice but not humans.
>>

>
> Yeah, this is ridicolous
> Rats and mice have nothing to do with humans with respect to trophic
> features
> They belong to a difference class compared to primate humans
> They are not adapted to an high carb diets of fruits, berries, vegetables,
> nut and fish
> In fact, while humans handle fructose quite well, fructose is quite
> dangerous to mice, but we know that primates eat fruits whereas I have never
> seen rats eating a banana
>
> As Steve Harris says "If you're a rat,
> you shouldn't eat fructose. Next rat that comes to me for a health
> consultation, I'll be sure and council him very well on the issue"
>
> So please, don't even post studies on rats or mice that are supposed to be
> used for human health, they're cruelty useless and if one is going to change
> his/her diet because of rats experiments then they become even dangerous !!
>
> Nicholas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:44 PM   #8
Duane Storey
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

This wouldn't surprised me.. Prostate cancer and male pattern baldness
are two sides of the same coin.. It's argued that that same coin is
related to PCOS in women, which as we know is primarily an insulin
resistance ailment. I've seen a few papers recently that hypothesise
about the link between MBP and insulin resistance.. We know low carb
diets are beneficial for people with insulin resistance, so I don't
think it's a big stretch to think that low carb diets may be
beneficial for the prostate as well (and hairloss? let's hope).

When insulin goes up, SHBG goes down, and free T goes up. More free t
means more DHT and estrogen, which affects the prostate.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:46 PM   #9
Duane Storey
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

This wouldn't surprised me.. Prostate cancer and male pattern baldness
are two sides of the same coin.. It's argued that that same coin is
related to PCOS in women, which as we know is primarily an insulin
resistance ailment. I've seen a few papers recently that hypothesise
about the link between MBP and insulin resistance.. We know low carb
diets are beneficial for people with insulin resistance, so I don't
think it's a big stretch to think that low carb diets may be
beneficial for the prostate as well (and hairloss? let's hope).

When insulin goes up, SHBG goes down, and free T goes up. More free t
means more DHT and estrogen, which affects the prostate.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:54 PM   #10
Pinkot
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

There are several classes of carbohydrates, the refined sugars are
carbohydrates but so are the beans and other legumes which are more complex
and have a low clycemic index. Practically everything we eat contains
carbohydrates.

"Duane Storey" <duanestorey@excite.com> wrote in message
news:7d873ede.0310301354.132790eb@posting.google.c om...
> This wouldn't surprised me.. Prostate cancer and male pattern baldness
> are two sides of the same coin.. It's argued that that same coin is
> related to PCOS in women, which as we know is primarily an insulin
> resistance ailment. I've seen a few papers recently that hypothesise
> about the link between MBP and insulin resistance.. We know low carb
> diets are beneficial for people with insulin resistance, so I don't
> think it's a big stretch to think that low carb diets may be
> beneficial for the prostate as well (and hairloss? let's hope).
>
> When insulin goes up, SHBG goes down, and free T goes up. More free t
> means more DHT and estrogen, which affects the prostate.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 01:54 PM   #11
Pinkot
 
Default Re: Low-carbs to fight prostate cancer?

There are several classes of carbohydrates, the refined sugars are
carbohydrates but so are the beans and other legumes which are more complex
and have a low clycemic index. Practically everything we eat contains
carbohydrates.

"Duane Storey" <duanestorey@excite.com> wrote in message
news:7d873ede.0310301354.132790eb@posting.google.c om...
> This wouldn't surprised me.. Prostate cancer and male pattern baldness
> are two sides of the same coin.. It's argued that that same coin is
> related to PCOS in women, which as we know is primarily an insulin
> resistance ailment. I've seen a few papers recently that hypothesise
> about the link between MBP and insulin resistance.. We know low carb
> diets are beneficial for people with insulin resistance, so I don't
> think it's a big stretch to think that low carb diets may be
> beneficial for the prostate as well (and hairloss? let's hope).
>
> When insulin goes up, SHBG goes down, and free T goes up. More free t
> means more DHT and estrogen, which affects the prostate.
  Reply With Quote
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