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Old 05-05-2007, 03:55 AM   #1
Roman Bystrianyk
 
Default Prostate Cancer and Vitamin D Deficiency

http://www.healthsentinel.com/news.p...st_item&id=724

Sally Squires, "A Deficiency of D?", Washington Post, April 5, 2005,
Link:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...av=rss_topnews

A new national study finds that most adults, especially those over 50,
fall short on recommended daily levels of vitamin D, an essential
nutrient long known to preserve bones and now increasingly tied to
protection against ailments from cancer to rheumatoid arthritis.

And no, just drinking more vitamin-D fortified milk or juice may not
make up the deficit, many experts say, although it can help. Spending
10 to 15 minutes in the sun, done with proper care, might.

The study is based on data drawn from a large, federally funded
national health survey and analyzed by a team of scientists from Boston
University and private industry. Presented yesterday at the
Experimental Biology annual meeting in San Diego, the study found that
vitamin D intakes peak during childhood and teenage years and then
decline.

Women ages 19 to 50, as well as men and women 51 and older, ate the
least food rich in vitamin D. Even when the team accounted for use of
vitamin D dietary supplements, few older men and women reached
recommended daily levels. The researchers concluded that the low
intakes, especially for the aged, "warrant intervention."

At a time when researchers are discovering a widening role for vitamin
D, "many lines of investigation indicate that most Americans do not
have optimal levels of vitamin D, mainly because of low sunlight
exposure," said Walter Willett, chairman of the Department of Nutrition
at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Willett convened a
meeting in January with leading vitamin D researchers and vitamin
manufacturers to review the latest findings. Since there are limited
food sources of vitamin D, "the most practical way to increase our
vitamin D levels is from supplements," Willett said.

Unlike other essential nutrients, vitamin D is made by the skin, which
requires ultraviolet light to produce the vitamin from cholesterol.
Those in the Washington area and others who live north of Newport News,
Va., often don't get enough sun exposure year round to make sufficient
vitamin D.

Concern over skin cancer means that more people are wearing sunblocks,
which inhibit production of vitamin D. Dark-skinned people have to
spend up to a couple of hours in the sun to make enough vitamin D.
Light-skinned people can get what they need in about 10 to 15 minutes.

The skin's ability to make vitamin D declines significantly with age.
For this reason, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) set the latest
vitamin D daily intake on an age-related scale: 200 International Units
(IU) -- about the amount found in two eight-ounce glasses of milk --
for those 19 to 50 years of age; 400 IU for those aged 51 to 70 years;
and 600 IU for people 70 and older. The NAS also set a tolerable upper
intake of 2,000 IU for adults. Toxic levels have been reported at
10,000 IU or higher per day.

But a growing number of scientists believe that vitamin D intake should
be at least 1,000 IU or higher.

"Fifty years ago, a bunch of guys got in a room and said, 'We know that
a teaspoon of cod liver oil cures rickets in a child and it has 400 IU
of vitamin D,' " said Bruce Hollis, a professor of pediatrics,
biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South
Carolina. "They transposed that amount onto adults. It was arbitrarily
set with no evidence [in adults] at all."

Where research once suggested a limited health role for vitamin D,
today there is increasing evidence that it protects against breast,
colon and prostate cancer. Population studies show that people with the
highest vitamin D levels are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis,
lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases than those
with lower levels. Plus it appears that vitamin D may protect against
heart disease, type 2 diabetes and the insulin resistance that precedes
it.

"If just half the chronic diseases laid at the feet of vitamin D pan
out, it will be quite significant," said Robert P. Heaney, a professor
of medicine at Creighton University in Omaha and a proponent for
increasing vitamin D intake.

Just a decade ago, scientists developed an inexpensive blood test that
more accurately determines vitamin D status. Use of that test revealed
widespread deficiencies and led the NAS to note in 1997 that vitamin D
"deficiency is now a significant concern in adults over the age of 50
years who live in the northern industrialized cities of the world."

In 2004, the dietary guidelines scientific committee concluded the
elderly, people with dark skin and those exposed to insufficient
sunlight "are at risk of being unable to maintain vitamin D status" and
may "need substantially more than" the 1997 recommendations called for.

But some doctors worry that the evidence is still preliminary. Few if
any studies "show that people are having problems with the lower limits
of vitamin D being where they are," said New York University
dermatologist Darrel Rigel, a past president of the American Academy of
Dermatology.

Dermatologists are particularly concerned that raising the vitamin D
recommendation might tempt some people to spend more time in the sun or
in tanning booths, thus increasing their risk of skin cancer. "Our
recommendation is to take either vitamin pills or eat food that we know
has higher levels of vitamin D," rather than increase sun exposure,
said Henry Lim, chairman of dermatology at the Henry Ford Hospital in
Detroit.

Here's how to boost vitamin D levels safely:

Drink vitamin D fortified beverages. While diet alone is unlikely to
get you to the levels needed, drinking milk and other vitamin D
fortified beverages will help. Some juice and soy milk is also
fortified. An 8-ounce glass of any of these beverages delivers about
100 IU, or about half the intake recommended daily for adults 19 to 50
years of age; a quarter of the amount for adults 51 to 70; and just a
sixth of the intake for those 70 and older. Yogurt and cheese are not
fortified with vitamin D.

Eat more herring and sardines. An ounce of pickled herring has nearly
200 IU of vitamin D. Two small sardines have 65 IU. But not all fish
contains vitamin D. Salmon and tuna, for example, have none.

Breakfast on fortified cereal or cereal bars. A cup of vitamin D
fortified cereal delivers about 40 to 60 IU of vitamin D. Fortified
cereal bars have even less: about 30 IU per bar.

Take a multivitamin or other supplement. Most multivitamins, even the
ones aimed at seniors, provide 400 IU of vitamin D, which won't cover
those 70 and older. Some vitamin and health food stores sell gelcaps of
vitamin D supplements that range from 700 IU to 2,000 IU. "The most
practical way to increase our vitamin D levels is from supplements,"
said Harvard's Willett.

Fun in the sun. Fifteen minutes of peak sun exposure without sunscreen
allows a light-skinned person to make about 20,000 IU of vitamin D,
according to Hollis. But much of that dose quickly "goes away," he
said. You'd need such exposures at least every few days in order to
sustain adequate levels. Since regular sun exposure increases skin
cancer risk, "it's okay to expose yourself a little to the sun," said
Henry Ford's Lim, "but not too much."
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2007, 03:56 AM   #2
John Que
 
Default Re: A Deficiency of D?

"Roman Bystrianyk" <rbystrianyk@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112745845.671244.205160@o13g2000cwo.googlegr oups.com...
> http://www.healthsentinel.com/news.p...st_item&id=724
>
> Sally Squires, "A Deficiency of D?", Washington Post, April 5, 2005,
> Link:
>

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...av=rss_topnews
>
> A new national study finds that most adults, especially those over 50,
> fall short on recommended daily levels of vitamin D, an essential
> nutrient long known to preserve bones and now increasingly tied to
> protection against ailments from cancer to rheumatoid arthritis.
>
> And no, just drinking more vitamin-D fortified milk or juice may not
> make up the deficit, many experts say, although it can help. Spending
> 10 to 15 minutes in the sun, done with proper care, might.
>
> The study is based on data drawn from a large, federally funded
> national health survey and analyzed by a team of scientists from Boston
> University and private industry. Presented yesterday at the
> Experimental Biology annual meeting in San Diego, the study found that
> vitamin D intakes peak during childhood and teenage years and then
> decline.
>
> Women ages 19 to 50, as well as men and women 51 and older, ate the
> least food rich in vitamin D. Even when the team accounted for use of
> vitamin D dietary supplements, few older men and women reached
> recommended daily levels. The researchers concluded that the low
> intakes, especially for the aged, "warrant intervention."
>
> At a time when researchers are discovering a widening role for vitamin
> D, "many lines of investigation indicate that most Americans do not
> have optimal levels of vitamin D, mainly because of low sunlight
> exposure," said Walter Willett, chairman of the Department of Nutrition
> at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Willett convened a
> meeting in January with leading vitamin D researchers and vitamin
> manufacturers to review the latest findings. Since there are limited
> food sources of vitamin D, "the most practical way to increase our
> vitamin D levels is from supplements," Willett said.
>
> Unlike other essential nutrients, vitamin D is made by the skin, which
> requires ultraviolet light to produce the vitamin from cholesterol.
> Those in the Washington area and others who live north of Newport News,
> Va., often don't get enough sun exposure year round to make sufficient
> vitamin D.
>
> Concern over skin cancer means that more people are wearing sunblocks,
> which inhibit production of vitamin D. Dark-skinned people have to
> spend up to a couple of hours in the sun to make enough vitamin D.
> Light-skinned people can get what they need in about 10 to 15 minutes.
>
> The skin's ability to make vitamin D declines significantly with age.
> For this reason, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) set the latest
> vitamin D daily intake on an age-related scale: 200 International Units
> (IU) -- about the amount found in two eight-ounce glasses of milk --
> for those 19 to 50 years of age; 400 IU for those aged 51 to 70 years;
> and 600 IU for people 70 and older. The NAS also set a tolerable upper
> intake of 2,000 IU for adults.


The UL is the wrong way to think about it. And the UL hence more or
less wrong. During the late fall and winter, 4000 is near the optimium
dose in normal individuals. In the spring and summer, a lower dose
for those that get out in the sun would be appropriate.


> Toxic levels have been reported at
> 10,000 IU or higher per day.


Even here, these individual are likely the tiny subset of the population
who are vitamin D sensitive such as those with Williams syndrome.

>
> But a growing number of scientists believe that vitamin D intake should
> be at least 1,000 IU or higher.
>
> "Fifty years ago, a bunch of guys got in a room and said, 'We know that
> a teaspoon of cod liver oil cures rickets in a child and it has 400 IU
> of vitamin D,' " said Bruce Hollis, a professor of pediatrics,
> biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South
> Carolina. "They transposed that amount onto adults. It was arbitrarily
> set with no evidence [in adults] at all."
>
> Where research once suggested a limited health role for vitamin D,
> today there is increasing evidence that it protects against breast,
> colon and prostate cancer. Population studies show that people with the
> highest vitamin D levels are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis,
> lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases than those
> with lower levels. Plus it appears that vitamin D may protect against
> heart disease, type 2 diabetes and the insulin resistance that precedes
> it.
>
> "If just half the chronic diseases laid at the feet of vitamin D pan
> out, it will be quite significant," said Robert P. Heaney, a professor
> of medicine at Creighton University in Omaha and a proponent for
> increasing vitamin D intake.
>
> Just a decade ago, scientists developed an inexpensive blood test that
> more accurately determines vitamin D status. Use of that test revealed
> widespread deficiencies and led the NAS to note in 1997 that vitamin D
> "deficiency is now a significant concern in adults over the age of 50
> years who live in the northern industrialized cities of the world."
>
> In 2004, the dietary guidelines scientific committee concluded the
> elderly, people with dark skin and those exposed to insufficient
> sunlight "are at risk of being unable to maintain vitamin D status" and
> may "need substantially more than" the 1997 recommendations called for.
>
> But some doctors worry that the evidence is still preliminary. Few if
> any studies "show that people are having problems with the lower limits
> of vitamin D being where they are," said New York University
> dermatologist Darrel Rigel, a past president of the American Academy of
> Dermatology.


Rigel should be forced to resign, IMO.
Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis,
prostate cancer, breast cancer, myopathy, TB, RA,
osteopenia and osteoporosis all have a
low vitamin D connections. Consider the reduced
rates DM type 1 seen in Finnish persons supplemented with
50 mcgs (2000 IU) over a span time in their infancy
and early childhood. Or look at the murine model
for breast cancer at PMID 15585794.
Of course more research is needed but this almost always true;
this need does not justify the current levels recommended for
vitamin D supplementation or the current fortification regime.


>
> Dermatologists are particularly concerned that raising the vitamin D
> recommendation might tempt some people to spend more time in the sun or
> in tanning booths, thus increasing their risk of skin cancer. "Our
> recommendation is to take either vitamin pills or eat food that we know
> has higher levels of vitamin D," rather than increase sun exposure,
> said Henry Lim, chairman of dermatology at the Henry Ford Hospital in
> Detroit.
>
> Here's how to boost vitamin D levels safely:
>
> Drink vitamin D fortified beverages. While diet alone is unlikely to
> get you to the levels needed, drinking milk and other vitamin D
> fortified beverages will help. Some juice and soy milk is also
> fortified. An 8-ounce glass of any of these beverages delivers about
> 100 IU, or about half the intake recommended daily for adults 19 to 50
> years of age; a quarter of the amount for adults 51 to 70; and just a
> sixth of the intake for those 70 and older. Yogurt and cheese are not
> fortified with vitamin D.


Some of the Soy products contain vitamin D-2 which is
inferior to vitamin D-3.

>
> Eat more herring and sardines. An ounce of pickled herring has nearly
> 200 IU of vitamin D. Two small sardines have 65 IU. But not all fish
> contains vitamin D. Salmon and tuna, for example, have none.
>
> Breakfast on fortified cereal or cereal bars. A cup of vitamin D
> fortified cereal delivers about 40 to 60 IU of vitamin D. Fortified
> cereal bars have even less: about 30 IU per bar.
>
> Take a multivitamin or other supplement. Most multivitamins, even the
> ones aimed at seniors, provide 400 IU of vitamin D, which won't cover
> those 70 and older. Some vitamin and health food stores sell gelcaps of
> vitamin D supplements that range from 700 IU to 2,000 IU. "The most
> practical way to increase our vitamin D levels is from supplements,"
> said Harvard's Willett.


Of some lame brains in southerly climes say all one needs is the
sun. They give no consideration that people in the higher latitudes don't
have
enough sun in the winter to get a meaningful dose of D.

>
> Fun in the sun. Fifteen minutes of peak sun exposure without sunscreen
> allows a light-skinned person to make about 20,000 IU of vitamin D,
> according to Hollis. But much of that dose quickly "goes away," he
> said. You'd need such exposures at least every few days in order to
> sustain adequate levels.


Most people when tested will show that their vitamin D
reserves are depleted by time it is winter.

> Since regular sun exposure increases skin
> cancer risk, "it's okay to expose yourself a little to the sun," said
> Henry Ford's Lim, "but not too much."
>
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2007, 03:56 AM   #3
jdrzal
 
Default Re: A Deficiency of D?

I was a thread away from osteoporosis, and was referred to an
endocrinologist, who did a battery of blood tests. My vitamin D and
calcium were below normal, so she prescribed these power packed (50,000
units) prescription Vitamin D capsules, one a week for 6 months, then
repeat blood work. That got my D and calcium up a little above normal, and
6 mos. after that, when I had my next dexa scan, I actually improved! I
did do more exercising (was sent to physical therapy for instruction) and
cut down on soda, too.

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
jdrzal@uic.edu
312-996-2543 (phone)

Joyce Drzal
University of Illinois at Chicago

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005, John Que wrote:

>
> "Roman Bystrianyk" <rbystrianyk@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1112745845.671244.205160@o13g2000cwo.googlegr oups.com...
> > http://www.healthsentinel.com/news.p...st_item&id=724
> >
> > Sally Squires, "A Deficiency of D?", Washington Post, April 5, 2005,
> > Link:
> >

> http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...av=rss_topnews
> >
> > A new national study finds that most adults, especially those over 50,
> > fall short on recommended daily levels of vitamin D, an essential
> > nutrient long known to preserve bones and now increasingly tied to
> > protection against ailments from cancer to rheumatoid arthritis.
> >
> > And no, just drinking more vitamin-D fortified milk or juice may not
> > make up the deficit, many experts say, although it can help. Spending
> > 10 to 15 minutes in the sun, done with proper care, might.
> >
> > The study is based on data drawn from a large, federally funded
> > national health survey and analyzed by a team of scientists from Boston
> > University and private industry. Presented yesterday at the
> > Experimental Biology annual meeting in San Diego, the study found that
> > vitamin D intakes peak during childhood and teenage years and then
> > decline.
> >
> > Women ages 19 to 50, as well as men and women 51 and older, ate the
> > least food rich in vitamin D. Even when the team accounted for use of
> > vitamin D dietary supplements, few older men and women reached
> > recommended daily levels. The researchers concluded that the low
> > intakes, especially for the aged, "warrant intervention."
> >
> > At a time when researchers are discovering a widening role for vitamin
> > D, "many lines of investigation indicate that most Americans do not
> > have optimal levels of vitamin D, mainly because of low sunlight
> > exposure," said Walter Willett, chairman of the Department of Nutrition
> > at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Willett convened a
> > meeting in January with leading vitamin D researchers and vitamin
> > manufacturers to review the latest findings. Since there are limited
> > food sources of vitamin D, "the most practical way to increase our
> > vitamin D levels is from supplements," Willett said.
> >
> > Unlike other essential nutrients, vitamin D is made by the skin, which
> > requires ultraviolet light to produce the vitamin from cholesterol.
> > Those in the Washington area and others who live north of Newport News,
> > Va., often don't get enough sun exposure year round to make sufficient
> > vitamin D.
> >
> > Concern over skin cancer means that more people are wearing sunblocks,
> > which inhibit production of vitamin D. Dark-skinned people have to
> > spend up to a couple of hours in the sun to make enough vitamin D.
> > Light-skinned people can get what they need in about 10 to 15 minutes.
> >
> > The skin's ability to make vitamin D declines significantly with age.
> > For this reason, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) set the latest
> > vitamin D daily intake on an age-related scale: 200 International Units
> > (IU) -- about the amount found in two eight-ounce glasses of milk --
> > for those 19 to 50 years of age; 400 IU for those aged 51 to 70 years;
> > and 600 IU for people 70 and older. The NAS also set a tolerable upper
> > intake of 2,000 IU for adults.

>
> The UL is the wrong way to think about it. And the UL hence more or
> less wrong. During the late fall and winter, 4000 is near the optimium
> dose in normal individuals. In the spring and summer, a lower dose
> for those that get out in the sun would be appropriate.
>
>
> > Toxic levels have been reported at
> > 10,000 IU or higher per day.

>
> Even here, these individual are likely the tiny subset of the population
> who are vitamin D sensitive such as those with Williams syndrome.
>
> >
> > But a growing number of scientists believe that vitamin D intake should
> > be at least 1,000 IU or higher.
> >
> > "Fifty years ago, a bunch of guys got in a room and said, 'We know that
> > a teaspoon of cod liver oil cures rickets in a child and it has 400 IU
> > of vitamin D,' " said Bruce Hollis, a professor of pediatrics,
> > biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South
> > Carolina. "They transposed that amount onto adults. It was arbitrarily
> > set with no evidence [in adults] at all."
> >
> > Where research once suggested a limited health role for vitamin D,
> > today there is increasing evidence that it protects against breast,
> > colon and prostate cancer. Population studies show that people with the
> > highest vitamin D levels are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis,
> > lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases than those
> > with lower levels. Plus it appears that vitamin D may protect against
> > heart disease, type 2 diabetes and the insulin resistance that precedes
> > it.
> >
> > "If just half the chronic diseases laid at the feet of vitamin D pan
> > out, it will be quite significant," said Robert P. Heaney, a professor
> > of medicine at Creighton University in Omaha and a proponent for
> > increasing vitamin D intake.
> >
> > Just a decade ago, scientists developed an inexpensive blood test that
> > more accurately determines vitamin D status. Use of that test revealed
> > widespread deficiencies and led the NAS to note in 1997 that vitamin D
> > "deficiency is now a significant concern in adults over the age of 50
> > years who live in the northern industrialized cities of the world."
> >
> > In 2004, the dietary guidelines scientific committee concluded the
> > elderly, people with dark skin and those exposed to insufficient
> > sunlight "are at risk of being unable to maintain vitamin D status" and
> > may "need substantially more than" the 1997 recommendations called for.
> >
> > But some doctors worry that the evidence is still preliminary. Few if
> > any studies "show that people are having problems with the lower limits
> > of vitamin D being where they are," said New York University
> > dermatologist Darrel Rigel, a past president of the American Academy of
> > Dermatology.

>
> Rigel should be forced to resign, IMO.
> Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis,
> prostate cancer, breast cancer, myopathy, TB, RA,
> osteopenia and osteoporosis all have a
> low vitamin D connections. Consider the reduced
> rates DM type 1 seen in Finnish persons supplemented with
> 50 mcgs (2000 IU) over a span time in their infancy
> and early childhood. Or look at the murine model
> for breast cancer at PMID 15585794.
> Of course more research is needed but this almost always true;
> this need does not justify the current levels recommended for
> vitamin D supplementation or the current fortification regime.
>
>
> >
> > Dermatologists are particularly concerned that raising the vitamin D
> > recommendation might tempt some people to spend more time in the sun or
> > in tanning booths, thus increasing their risk of skin cancer. "Our
> > recommendation is to take either vitamin pills or eat food that we know
> > has higher levels of vitamin D," rather than increase sun exposure,
> > said Henry Lim, chairman of dermatology at the Henry Ford Hospital in
> > Detroit.
> >
> > Here's how to boost vitamin D levels safely:
> >
> > Drink vitamin D fortified beverages. While diet alone is unlikely to
> > get you to the levels needed, drinking milk and other vitamin D
> > fortified beverages will help. Some juice and soy milk is also
> > fortified. An 8-ounce glass of any of these beverages delivers about
> > 100 IU, or about half the intake recommended daily for adults 19 to 50
> > years of age; a quarter of the amount for adults 51 to 70; and just a
> > sixth of the intake for those 70 and older. Yogurt and cheese are not
> > fortified with vitamin D.

>
> Some of the Soy products contain vitamin D-2 which is
> inferior to vitamin D-3.
>
> >
> > Eat more herring and sardines. An ounce of pickled herring has nearly
> > 200 IU of vitamin D. Two small sardines have 65 IU. But not all fish
> > contains vitamin D. Salmon and tuna, for example, have none.
> >
> > Breakfast on fortified cereal or cereal bars. A cup of vitamin D
> > fortified cereal delivers about 40 to 60 IU of vitamin D. Fortified
> > cereal bars have even less: about 30 IU per bar.
> >
> > Take a multivitamin or other supplement. Most multivitamins, even the
> > ones aimed at seniors, provide 400 IU of vitamin D, which won't cover
> > those 70 and older. Some vitamin and health food stores sell gelcaps of
> > vitamin D supplements that range from 700 IU to 2,000 IU. "The most
> > practical way to increase our vitamin D levels is from supplements,"
> > said Harvard's Willett.

>
> Of some lame brains in southerly climes say all one needs is the
> sun. They give no consideration that people in the higher latitudes don't
> have
> enough sun in the winter to get a meaningful dose of D.
>
> >
> > Fun in the sun. Fifteen minutes of peak sun exposure without sunscreen
> > allows a light-skinned person to make about 20,000 IU of vitamin D,
> > according to Hollis. But much of that dose quickly "goes away," he
> > said. You'd need such exposures at least every few days in order to
> > sustain adequate levels.

>
> Most people when tested will show that their vitamin D
> reserves are depleted by time it is winter.
>
> > Since regular sun exposure increases skin
> > cancer risk, "it's okay to expose yourself a little to the sun," said
> > Henry Ford's Lim, "but not too much."
> >

>
>
>
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2007, 03:57 AM   #4
Ron Peterson
 
Default Re: A Deficiency of D?

jdrzal wrote:
> I was a thread away from osteoporosis, and was referred to an
> endocrinologist, who did a battery of blood tests. My vitamin D and
> calcium were below normal, so she prescribed these power packed

(50,000
> units) prescription Vitamin D capsules, one a week for 6 months, then
> repeat blood work. That got my D and calcium up a little above

normal, and
> 6 mos. after that, when I had my next dexa scan, I actually improved!

I
> did do more exercising (was sent to physical therapy for instruction)

and
> cut down on soda, too.


Which types of exercise were emphasized and to what level of
performance was deemed adequate?

--
Ron
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2007, 03:57 AM   #5
jdrzal
 
Default Re: A Deficiency of D?

I'll get my papers from home and e-mail more details tomorrow, but one of
them was using one of those plastic steps (or a small stack of books would
work if they don't slide around), and putting one foot on the step and one
on the floor, then pulling the floor leg up to the level of the one on the
step, to strengthen the leg on the step, then doing the same with the
other leg. Another was to put your back against the wall and slide down,
keeping your knees straight, like the kneecaps in line, and pointing
straight ahead like your toes. These are harder than they sound :-)


~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
jdrzal@uic.edu
312-996-2543 (phone)

Joyce Drzal
University of Illinois at Chicago

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005, Ron Peterson wrote:

>
> jdrzal wrote:
> > I was a thread away from osteoporosis, and was referred to an
> > endocrinologist, who did a battery of blood tests. My vitamin D and
> > calcium were below normal, so she prescribed these power packed

> (50,000
> > units) prescription Vitamin D capsules, one a week for 6 months, then
> > repeat blood work. That got my D and calcium up a little above

> normal, and
> > 6 mos. after that, when I had my next dexa scan, I actually improved!

> I
> > did do more exercising (was sent to physical therapy for instruction)

> and
> > cut down on soda, too.

>
> Which types of exercise were emphasized and to what level of
> performance was deemed adequate?
>
> --
> Ron
>
>
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2007, 03:58 AM   #6
John Que
 
Default Re: A Deficiency of D?

My posting is below.

"jdrzal" <jdrzal@uic.edu> wrote in message
news:Pine.A41.4.58.0504060926150.239846@tigger.cc. uic.edu...
> I was a thread away from osteoporosis, and was referred to an
> endocrinologist, who did a battery of blood tests. My vitamin D and
> calcium were below normal, so she prescribed these power packed (50,000
> units) prescription Vitamin D capsules, one a week for 6 months, then
> repeat blood work. That got my D and calcium up a little above normal, and
> 6 mos. after that, when I had my next dexa scan, I actually improved! I
> did do more exercising (was sent to physical therapy for instruction) and
> cut down on soda, too.
>
>


The high powered vitamin D capsule is vitamin D2 not D3.
As I recall Vieth says D3 is the preferred form. Vitamin
D2 is more of a vitamin analog than the real vitamin according
to Vieth. Personally I take 4000 IU (100 mcg) per day
during the late fall and winter and after any day spent
completely indoors. I try to get some midday sun
with the shirt off.

If I were you, I'd consider taking a large vitamin K supplement.
Indeed, I take one but not for bone density. Of course
with the reservation that you're not taking warfarin!!
Do a literature search before decide to take it

Depending on your age and your serum DHEA levels,
I'd consider a DHEA "supplement" instead of an estrogen.
And yes this is rather experimental. Just remember
that my first posting to the Usenet came on sci.life-extension ;-)
so that is my nature.

Do you have Crohn's disease or have you ever been
checked of celiac disease? The latter is often only
diagnosised after decades of running to the Doctors.
And there is a test for it, now. If you are in 40's
and have Osteo, I really suspect this as a possibility.

Have you ever be on glucocorticoid steroid such as Predisone?
Have you ever been confined to bed for a prolonged period?
Both will \weaken the bones.

A boron supplement may have some merits as possible
would a magnesium supplement.

Exercise is good. Some are better than others.

JQ
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Old 05-05-2007, 04:00 AM   #7
plaidwsr@hotmail.com
 
Default Re: A Deficiency of D?

Well, this couldn't be more timely.

I posted in February under the title, "Osteopenia & DEXA Question"
(link here

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...23b8adc110c505


.... Since then, I went to a rheumatologist (specializing is
osteoporosis), and she did a pretty in depth battery of tests. My
follow-up appointment isn't for a few more weeks, but I got a call
yesterday from her aide saying that they were writing an rx for
prescription vitamin D, because mine's low. She didn't give more
information than that, and I was caught off guard enough that I didn't
have any questions at the ready.

Following that, though, I did some research on Vitamin D. I ended up
with more questions than answers.

I wondered if my D was low because the test was done in March (I live
in Pennsylvania - and even though I walk to/from work a few miles every
day, usually in daylight, I don't know if that's enough sun or not.)
If the test is re-run now, post daylight savings, when I spend 1-3
hours per day running or bicycling in sunlight, would the reading
likely be different. I also wondered if this "low" reading was the
result of having cast such a wide net in terms of testing that
something was bound to come up abnormal. And now, based on this WP
article, I wonder if it is clinically insignificant to have low D,
because so many people do (and many are apparently asymptomatic.)

I don't have the exact numbers from my testing, and I'm curious to see
what my calcium and PTH readings are. If they're both normal - is this
low reading just a red herring?

Or, does low D always lead to low calcium, which could (I've just
learned) explain the chronic bone/joint pains I've had for about 5
years - and blamed on a combination of not knowing when to stop
(athletic injuries), and psychosomatic causes, and also some
paresthesias (especially in my face) for which no cause has been found,
and is assumed to also be psychosomatic. I'm not actively looking for
the cause anymore, but I'd be curious to learn if this is related.

And, finally, do I need to know *why* my D is low? Or, is it enough to
know that it is. And, is there any reason NOT to take those rx D pills?


(Replies to the group are preferred to email.)


Thanks!

-- Wanda
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