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Old 04-29-2007, 07:14 AM   #1
J
 
Default Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostatecancer

This is crossposted to 2 newsgroups.
J

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=23939 Published: Friday, 20-Apr-2007
Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostate
cancer

Randomized studies comparing conservative therapy to definitive therapy in
men with prostate cancer (CaP) are underway, but not yet available.

Dr. Tewari and associates used the Henry Ford database to analyze the
outcomes of 3,159 men treated either conservatively or with radiotherapy
or radical prostatectomy (RP) in the years 1980 to 1997.Their report
suggesting superior outcomes for active treatment appears in Urology .

Participants were younger than 75 years and had socioeconomic, clinical,
pathological and demographic data reviewed. Men with positive bones scans
were excluded.

The primary endpoint was death from all causes and the secondary endpoint
was death from CaP. Radiotherapy or RP had to be received by the patient
within 6 months of diagnosis.

The treatment characteristics revealed that 42% were treated
conservatively, 28% received radiotherapy and 30% underwent RP.

Patients who underwent RP were younger and healthier (by Charlson scores).

Both radiotherapy and RP men had more aggressive tumor histology.

Patients from 1980 to 1990 were more likely to be treated conservatively
than patients seem after 1990 (59% vs. 30%).

An equal proportion of black and white men were treated conservatively,
but more blacks underwent radiotherapy. Surgery patients tended to be
white and live in an area of higher income.

Surgery reduced the 15-year mortality rate by 59% overall and by 47%, 60%,
and 65% for men with grade 1, 2, and 3 tumors, respectively.

The overall survival advantage was 8.6 years and was 6.8, 5.5, and 10.4
years for patients with grade 1, 2, and 3 disease, respectively.

Radiotherapy patients also experienced a survival advantage with a
reduction in mortality of 33%. The survival advantage was also found for
CaP-specific survival. Radiotherapy or RP reduced the death rate from CaP
by 38% and 63%, respectively, compared with patients treated
conservatively.

Overall, but not cancer-specific mortality correlated with Charlson index
scores.

The reduction in mortality was greatest in patients with poorly
differentiated CaP undergoing surgery, but decreases in death occurred in
all subsets of patients undergoing definitive treatment.

Referee pathologic review was not performed, although all pathology was
interpreted at the single institution.

Tewari A, Raman JD, Chang P, Rao S, Divine G, Menon M

Urol 2006;68(6):1268-74

By Christopher P. Evans, MD

http://www.urotoday.com

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Old 04-29-2007, 07:14 AM   #2
Ron
 
Default Re: Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostate cancer

Am I reading this right? It looks as though the doctor is saying that grade
1& 2 tumors have a lower survival rate than grade 3.
Ron
"J" <philomath@execulink.com> wrote in message
news:462DE990.C94879CA@execulink.com...
> This is crossposted to 2 newsgroups.
> J
>
> http://www.news-medical.net/?id=23939 Published: Friday, 20-Apr-2007
> Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostate
> cancer
>
> Randomized studies comparing conservative therapy to definitive therapy in
> men with prostate cancer (CaP) are underway, but not yet available.
>
> Dr. Tewari and associates used the Henry Ford database to analyze the
> outcomes of 3,159 men treated either conservatively or with radiotherapy
> or radical prostatectomy (RP) in the years 1980 to 1997.Their report
> suggesting superior outcomes for active treatment appears in Urology .
>
> Participants were younger than 75 years and had socioeconomic, clinical,
> pathological and demographic data reviewed. Men with positive bones scans
> were excluded.
>
> The primary endpoint was death from all causes and the secondary endpoint
> was death from CaP. Radiotherapy or RP had to be received by the patient
> within 6 months of diagnosis.
>
> The treatment characteristics revealed that 42% were treated
> conservatively, 28% received radiotherapy and 30% underwent RP.
>
> Patients who underwent RP were younger and healthier (by Charlson scores).
>
> Both radiotherapy and RP men had more aggressive tumor histology.
>
> Patients from 1980 to 1990 were more likely to be treated conservatively
> than patients seem after 1990 (59% vs. 30%).
>
> An equal proportion of black and white men were treated conservatively,
> but more blacks underwent radiotherapy. Surgery patients tended to be
> white and live in an area of higher income.
>
> Surgery reduced the 15-year mortality rate by 59% overall and by 47%, 60%,
> and 65% for men with grade 1, 2, and 3 tumors, respectively.
>
> The overall survival advantage was 8.6 years and was 6.8, 5.5, and 10.4
> years for patients with grade 1, 2, and 3 disease, respectively.
>
> Radiotherapy patients also experienced a survival advantage with a
> reduction in mortality of 33%. The survival advantage was also found for
> CaP-specific survival. Radiotherapy or RP reduced the death rate from CaP
> by 38% and 63%, respectively, compared with patients treated
> conservatively.
>
> Overall, but not cancer-specific mortality correlated with Charlson index
> scores.
>
> The reduction in mortality was greatest in patients with poorly
> differentiated CaP undergoing surgery, but decreases in death occurred in
> all subsets of patients undergoing definitive treatment.
>
> Referee pathologic review was not performed, although all pathology was
> interpreted at the single institution.
>
> Tewari A, Raman JD, Chang P, Rao S, Divine G, Menon M
>
> Urol 2006;68(6):1268-74
>
> By Christopher P. Evans, MD
>
> http://www.urotoday.com
>



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Old 04-29-2007, 07:15 AM   #3
ron
 
Default Re: Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostate cancer

On Apr 24, 1:13 pm, "Ron" <r...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Am I reading this right? It looks as though the doctor is saying that grade
> 1& 2 tumors have a lower survival rate than grade 3.
> Ron"J" <philom...@execulink.com> wrote in message
>
> news:462DE990.C94879CA@execulink.com...
>
>
>
> > This is crossposted to 2 newsgroups.
> > J

>
> >http://www.news-medical.net/?id=23939Published: Friday, 20-Apr-2007
> > Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostate
> > cancer

>
> > Randomized studies comparing conservative therapy to definitive therapy in
> > men with prostate cancer (CaP) are underway, but not yet available.

>
> > Dr. Tewari and associates used the Henry Ford database to analyze the
> > outcomes of 3,159 men treated either conservatively or with radiotherapy
> > or radical prostatectomy (RP) in the years 1980 to 1997.Their report
> > suggesting superior outcomes for active treatment appears in Urology .

>
> > Participants were younger than 75 years and had socioeconomic, clinical,
> > pathological and demographic data reviewed. Men with positive bones scans
> > were excluded.

>
> > The primary endpoint was death from all causes and the secondary endpoint
> > was death from CaP. Radiotherapy or RP had to be received by the patient
> > within 6 months of diagnosis.

>
> > The treatment characteristics revealed that 42% were treated
> > conservatively, 28% received radiotherapy and 30% underwent RP.

>
> > Patients who underwent RP were younger and healthier (by Charlson scores).

>
> > Both radiotherapy and RP men had more aggressive tumor histology.

>
> > Patients from 1980 to 1990 were more likely to be treated conservatively
> > than patients seem after 1990 (59% vs. 30%).

>
> > An equal proportion of black and white men were treated conservatively,
> > but more blacks underwent radiotherapy. Surgery patients tended to be
> > white and live in an area of higher income.

>
> > Surgery reduced the 15-year mortality rate by 59% overall and by 47%, 60%,
> > and 65% for men with grade 1, 2, and 3 tumors, respectively.

>
> > The overall survival advantage was 8.6 years and was 6.8, 5.5, and 10.4
> > years for patients with grade 1, 2, and 3 disease, respectively.

>
> > Radiotherapy patients also experienced a survival advantage with a
> > reduction in mortality of 33%. The survival advantage was also found for
> > CaP-specific survival. Radiotherapy or RP reduced the death rate from CaP
> > by 38% and 63%, respectively, compared with patients treated
> > conservatively.

>
> > Overall, but not cancer-specific mortality correlated with Charlson index
> > scores.

>
> > The reduction in mortality was greatest in patients with poorly
> > differentiated CaP undergoing surgery, but decreases in death occurred in
> > all subsets of patients undergoing definitive treatment.

>
> > Referee pathologic review was not performed, although all pathology was
> > interpreted at the single institution.

>
> > Tewari A, Raman JD, Chang P, Rao S, Divine G, Menon M

>
> > Urol 2006;68(6):1268-74

>
> > By Christopher P. Evans, MD

>
> >http://www.urotoday.com- Hide quoted text -

>
> - Show quoted text -


No, the paper discusses mortality rates (and survival advantages).
The mortality rate is reduced for all grades, but the reduction in
mortality is greatest for grade 3...Best wishes and good health, ron

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Old 05-02-2007, 09:59 PM   #4
rosbif
 
Default Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostatecancer

On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 12:13:38 -0700, "Ron" <ron@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Am I reading this right? It looks as though the doctor is saying that grade
>1& 2 tumors have a lower survival rate than grade 3.
>Ron


Ron, the way I'm reading this, is that mortality rates are *improved*
(they use *reduced*) by the respective percentages. I'm taking that
to mean that grade 1 tumours - which obviously start from a lower base
threat in any case - are improved to a lower extent. I think that
makes sense.

>"J" <philomath@execulink.com> wrote in message
>news:462DE990.C94879CA@execulink.com...
>> This is crossposted to 2 newsgroups.
>> J
>>
>> http://www.news-medical.net/?id=23939 Published: Friday, 20-Apr-2007
>> Long-term survival probability in men with clinically localized prostate
>> cancer
>>
>> Randomized studies comparing conservative therapy to definitive therapy in
>> men with prostate cancer (CaP) are underway, but not yet available.
>>
>> Dr. Tewari and associates used the Henry Ford database to analyze the
>> outcomes of 3,159 men treated either conservatively or with radiotherapy
>> or radical prostatectomy (RP) in the years 1980 to 1997.Their report
>> suggesting superior outcomes for active treatment appears in Urology .
>>
>> Participants were younger than 75 years and had socioeconomic, clinical,
>> pathological and demographic data reviewed. Men with positive bones scans
>> were excluded.
>>
>> The primary endpoint was death from all causes and the secondary endpoint
>> was death from CaP. Radiotherapy or RP had to be received by the patient
>> within 6 months of diagnosis.
>>
>> The treatment characteristics revealed that 42% were treated
>> conservatively, 28% received radiotherapy and 30% underwent RP.
>>
>> Patients who underwent RP were younger and healthier (by Charlson scores).
>>
>> Both radiotherapy and RP men had more aggressive tumor histology.
>>
>> Patients from 1980 to 1990 were more likely to be treated conservatively
>> than patients seem after 1990 (59% vs. 30%).
>>
>> An equal proportion of black and white men were treated conservatively,
>> but more blacks underwent radiotherapy. Surgery patients tended to be
>> white and live in an area of higher income.
>>
>> Surgery reduced the 15-year mortality rate by 59% overall and by 47%, 60%,
>> and 65% for men with grade 1, 2, and 3 tumors, respectively.
>>
>> The overall survival advantage was 8.6 years and was 6.8, 5.5, and 10.4
>> years for patients with grade 1, 2, and 3 disease, respectively.
>>
>> Radiotherapy patients also experienced a survival advantage with a
>> reduction in mortality of 33%. The survival advantage was also found for
>> CaP-specific survival. Radiotherapy or RP reduced the death rate from CaP
>> by 38% and 63%, respectively, compared with patients treated
>> conservatively.
>>
>> Overall, but not cancer-specific mortality correlated with Charlson index
>> scores.
>>
>> The reduction in mortality was greatest in patients with poorly
>> differentiated CaP undergoing surgery, but decreases in death occurred in
>> all subsets of patients undergoing definitive treatment.
>>
>> Referee pathologic review was not performed, although all pathology was
>> interpreted at the single institution.
>>
>> Tewari A, Raman JD, Chang P, Rao S, Divine G, Menon M
>>
>> Urol 2006;68(6):1268-74
>>
>> By Christopher P. Evans, MD
>>
>> http://www.urotoday.com
>>

>

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